Friday, December 10, 2010

Information Poverty: A barrier to Agricultural Productivity in Rural areas.

The agricultural sector is one of the most under exploited in many African Countries today. In Uganda alone, about 80% of the now approximately 32 million people http://data.worldbank.org/country/uganda  are rural based and depend almost entirely on Agriculture at various Levels of livelihood.

Information poverty is the absolute lack of accurate and timely Agricultural information to effect positive change in this case in the Agriculture Sector. Much as it is believed by many, that access to timely information by rural communities cannot only increase agricultural productivity but enhance social and economic development, many farmers in rural areas lack even the basic access to information.

Can ICTs bridge the Information Poverty gap?

Technologies affects all aspects of life be it social, economic or political. It’s therefore important to understand the role technology can play in Agriculture; to increase productivity, reduce costs as well as increase on the customer base. ICTs have been used as enablers in other sectors like Education, Entrepreneurship, health and sports but their adoption, usage and application in Agriculture is low despite the big role agriculture plays in society.
The inability to access accurate and timely information by rural farmers on climate change, market prices and best practices has negatively affected the final out put in terms of yields and profits. ICTs can play a big role is solving the problem of information poverty among rural farmers. The mobile phone whose penetration into Africa alone is over 500M http://ht.ly/37Ks7 a hand tool that can be used for several purposes because of its ability to combine text, Audio and Video functionality in addition to its ability to cut across literacy levels(Farmers are able to communicate in their local languages). The community radios, Telecenters/Information resource centre and print Media like farmer Magazines are all ICTs that farmers can use to access agricultural information.



MobileActive Video: Mobile phones in rural development & agriculture
Way Forward
Despite a number of challenges faced by the Agricultural sector, there are some things to consider inorder to bridge the Agricultural divide. Some of them are;
·          -Actively involving the Youth in Agricultural initiatives because being the biggest users of ICTs, their potential can be tapped into to divert their skills to Agriculture. They need to start looking at Agriculture as a source of income(Agrobusiness) and not as a dirty job like it has been potryed to them.

·         The agricultural projects must be very Gender sensitive right from the start. In most African Counties, women dominate in agricultural production yet the men do lots of marketing. It’s important to let each Gender play a role right from production to marketing in order to achieve Agricultural food security.

·         Agriculturalists need to work very closely with Journalists. Media plays a very big role in changing the perception people have towards agriculture as a dirty job and a sector of failures. Since journalists set the news agenda, they have to be well informed such that they can document agricultural success stories and stop focusing on only agricultural disasters like famine and floods.

·         Take advantage of New and social media to educate, inform, motivate and involve a number of different stakeholders about the role agriculture can play in economic development of society.

Wednesday, December 1, 2010

MY FIRST AWARD EVER: EAST AFRICA REGIONAL WINNER.

Having been the very first of its kind; The ARDYIS Youth essay Contest focused on Youth, ICT in Agriculture and Rural Development aimed at identifying innovative solutions to challenges faced by youth in agriculture and rural areas using Information and Communication Technologies.
The essay contest which was open to young people, aged 18 - 25 years old, from urban or rural areas of Africa, Caribbean and the Pacific countries attracted 184 youth applications and only 12 finalists from the six regions were shortlisted. I was among the Young women/professionals who applied and I answered the question on "How young people are using ICTs innovetatively in Agriculture" with a case of a young fruit grower Mr. Gilbert Egwel from Northern Uganda in Apac district.


On 13th October 2010, 12 Finalists with two from each of the six regions of the African, Caribean and Pacific regions (ACP) were announced. After the evaluation of oral presentations of the selected essay took place in South Africa on 22 and 23 November 2010, as part of the CTA/NPCA Week events organized by CTA and the NPCA (NEPAD Planning and Coordinating Agency) from 22 to 26 November 2010. The 6 winners of the contest were to be announced on 24 November 2010. One winner per ACP region, and an overall winner. However, 7 winners emerged with 2 coming from East Africa as opposed to one. And the winners were:
West Africa:
- Itodo Samuel Anthony (Nigeria)

Central Africa :
- Gabriel Dacko Goudjo (Cameroon)

East Africa
- Maureen Agena (Uganda)
- Chris Ngige Mwangi (Kenya)
Southern Africa
- Gerald Musakaruka Mangena (Zimbabwe)

Caribbean
- Tyrone Christopher Hall (Jamaica)

Pacific
- Riten Gosai Chand (Fiji)
With Caribbean regional winner Tyrone Christopher Hall from Jamaica emerging as the overall Eassy Contest winners.


To all the winners and finalists, WELL DONE and WELL WON and to The centre for Agriculture and Technical rural development(CTA) thanks for looking at the youth as potential players in bridging the Agricultural divide through the use and application of ICTs.